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5-9
$450.00
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Trekking Tours Climbing and Expedition
5-11
$450.00
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Trekking Tours Climbing and Expedition
7-10
$475.00
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Trekking Tours Climbing and Expedition
19
$1,100.00
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Mt Annapurna climb with Imagine Nepal
40
$21,500.00
March, April
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1-13
$1,400.00
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Trekking in Nepal, Expedition in Nepal, Tours, Peak Climbing, Visit Nepal 2020, Everest Expeditio...
1-8
$750.00
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Trekking in Nepal, Expedition in Nepal, Tours, Peak Climbing, Visit Nepal 2020, Everest Expeditio...
1-15
$2,300.00
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Annapurna I Overview

There are plenty of superlatives that can be associated with Annapurna I, the highest of the six main summits on the Annapurna massif. The peak was the first 8,000-metre (26,000-foot) tall mountain to be climbed. Since then it has also become the most deadly.

The Annapurna massif sits in the heart of the Neaplese Himalayas, roughly 1765 kilometres (110 miles) northwest of the capital, Kathmandu. The entire massif is quite large, extending 55 kilometres (34 miles) in length. Annapurna I sits at the very northwestern end of the massif and as a result, is frequently approached and climbed from the northwest face. 

The entire massif sits within the Annapurna Conservation Area, and its basecamp is a popular stop on several of the area’s world-class treks, including the Annapurna Sanctuary and Circuit treks.

Quick Facts about Annapurna I

  • The entire Annapurna massif is named after Annapurna, the Hindu goddess of food and nourishment who, according to legend, lives at the top of Annapurna I. From the local Sanskrit language, Annapurna roughly translates to “ever-filled”.
  • The south face route up Annapurna I includes a 3,000-metre (9,800-foot) ascent up a massive rock wall and is considered by many experienced mountaineers to be one of the world’s most difficult climbs.
  • In spite of being the tenth tallest mountain in the world, the starting point of the climb is not too far below the summit. With 2,984 metres (9,790 feet) separating the two points, Annapurna I only ranks as the hundredth most prominent peak in the world.

History of Annapurna I

While the Annapurna massif has long been a prominent feature of the Hiamlaayan skyline, Annapurna I was not climbed for the first time until 1950. On June 3, a French expedition led by Maurice Herzog and Louis Lachenal arrived at the summit after climbing via the north face.

After this monumental feat, Annapurna I would not be climbed again until a pair of British mountaineers climbed the peak for the first time from its more remote and challenging south face. 

Over the years, Annapurna I quickly became recognisable as the most deadly of the 8000ers, with a fatality rate of 34 deaths per 100 safe returns. The most recent fatality came in January 2020, while the earliest fatality was recorded during the second ascent of the peak in 1970. 

Experience Required for Climbing Annapurna I

Along with being the first 8000er to be climbed and most deadly, Annapurna I is close to another superlative: it is also one of the most challenging. 

Even the easiest route to the summit – the northwest route – requires a fairly high level of glacier, snow and ice climbing to achieve. 

Away from the technical challenges of summiting Annapurna I, there are others as well. The peak is quite steep and the surface is unevenly packed. As a result, avalanches are not uncommon and can come quickly and without warning. The vast majority of Annapurna I’s fatalities are as a result of avalanches. 

Main Routes up Annapurna I

There are two main routes that lead to the summit of Annapurna I: the northwest route and the south face route. 

The northwest route is less technically challenging, but also more prone to avalanches, while the south face route is a bit safer but requires a far higher level of rock and ice climbing ability. 

The northwest route begins with an ascent of the northwest spur, which is quite steep and technical. This lets out onto a plateau, which must be traversed to the north end of the glaciated peak. 

After the plateau is crossed, climbers will ascend a feature known as the sickle, before traversing the snowfields above and continuing on to the summit. 

The south face route is more difficult, but more straightforward. After traversing the Annapurna glacier, climbers head up onto the south col. From the col, climbers will follow an icy ridge up to the ice wall and over the flat iron, before continuing directly on to the summit. 

Along the way, climbers will set up various camps at small plateaus. This also helps with acclimatisation. 

Useful info about Annapurna I

Height: 8,091 metres  (26,545 feet)

Weather: During the climbing season, average daily temperatures hover around 15 ºC (60 ºF) at the base of the mountain and steadily decrease to below freezing as elevation is gained. The climbing season also coincides with the dry season on the mountain, so little precipitation falls.

Peak Climbing Season: April to May, September to October

Summit Window: April to May, September to October

Average Expedition Length: 55 days

Accepted Currencies: Nepalese rupee (NPR)

Language: Nepali

How To Get To Annapurna I

Any trip to Annapurna I begins with a flight into Tribhuvan International Airport (KTM), in Kathmandu. Most guides will opt to meet here and arrange transport to Pokhara or Chamje before making the 10-day trek to Annapurna’s base camp.

Your travel route will vary depending on the expedition you choose. Please refer to the individual guides expeditions for more information.

Quick Facts about Annapurna I

  • The entire Annapurna massif is named after Annapurna, the Hindu goddess of food and nourishment who, according to legend, lives at the top of Annapurna I. From the local Sanskrit language, Annapurna roughly translates to “ever-filled”.
  • The south face route up Annapurna I includes a 3,000-metre (9,800-foot) ascent up a massive rock wall and is considered by many experienced mountaineers to be one of the world’s most difficult climbs.
  • In spite of being the tenth tallest mountain in the world, the starting point of the climb is not too far below the summit. With 2,984 metres (9,790 feet) separating the two points, Annapurna I only ranks as the hundredth most prominent peak in the world.

History of Annapurna I

While the Annapurna massif has long been a prominent feature of the Hiamlaayan skyline, Annapurna I was not climbed for the first time until 1950. On June 3, a French expedition led by Maurice Herzog and Louis Lachenal arrived at the summit after climbing via the north face.

After this monumental feat, Annapurna I would not be climbed again until a pair of British mountaineers climbed the peak for the first time from its more remote and challenging south face. 

Over the years, Annapurna I quickly became recognisable as the most deadly of the 8000ers, with a fatality rate of 34 deaths per 100 safe returns. The most recent fatality came in January 2020, while the earliest fatality was recorded during the second ascent of the peak in 1970. 

Experience Required for Climbing Annapurna I

Along with being the first 8000er to be climbed and most deadly, Annapurna I is close to another superlative: it is also one of the most challenging. 

Even the easiest route to the summit – the northwest route – requires a fairly high level of glacier, snow and ice climbing to achieve. 

Away from the technical challenges of summiting Annapurna I, there are others as well. The peak is quite steep and the surface is unevenly packed. As a result, avalanches are not uncommon and can come quickly and without warning. The vast majority of Annapurna I’s fatalities are as a result of avalanches. 

Main Routes up Annapurna I

There are two main routes that lead to the summit of Annapurna I: the northwest route and the south face route. 

The northwest route is less technically challenging, but also more prone to avalanches, while the south face route is a bit safer but requires a far higher level of rock and ice climbing ability. 

The northwest route begins with an ascent of the northwest spur, which is quite steep and technical. This lets out onto a plateau, which must be traversed to the north end of the glaciated peak. 

After the plateau is crossed, climbers will ascend a feature known as the sickle, before traversing the snowfields above and continuing on to the summit. 

The south face route is more difficult, but more straightforward. After traversing the Annapurna glacier, climbers head up onto the south col. From the col, climbers will follow an icy ridge up to the ice wall and over the flat iron, before continuing directly on to the summit. 

Along the way, climbers will set up various camps at small plateaus. This also helps with acclimatisation. 

Annapurna I Equipment List coming soon

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